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Note: This post was first published on the Fulcrum blog. Ann Arbor, MI — The University of Michigan Press/Michigan Publishing, in collaboration with University of Michigan Library IT, is proud to announce the initial beta launch of its Fulcrum publishing platform. In its beta phase, Fulcrum is focused on the presentation of digital source and supplemental materials that cannot be represented adequately in print form. Fulcrum allows for a richer experience and deeper understanding for the reader…

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The University of Michigan Library and Press have received $10,000 from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation to fund a workshop in fall 2016 focused on the development of guidelines for describing visual resources within digital publications. Textual description of visual resources is a requirement for accessible digital publications and fundamental to the discoverability and sustainability of visual content in the digital publishing ecosystem. The workshop will bring together professionals from the fields of art and…

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[On behalf of the University of Michigan Press E-Book Accessibility Task Force] Recently the University of Michigan Press publicly endorsed the accessible publishing guidelines outlined by the Society for Disability Studies. These guidelines encourage publishers to ensure that accessibility is “built in” to new titles—that accessible file formats, text descriptions of multimedia, and available alternate versions are standard products of the publishing process. The Press strongly believes in this universal design approach, and since June…

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We are excited to announce the release of the Journal of Electronic Publishing‘s special issue titled “Metrics for Measuring Publishing Value: Alternative and Otherwise”. This eclectic issue brings together thoughtful research, reporting, and case studies on new forms of evaluation in addition to invigorating older forms of evaluation with new ideas and perspectives. Articles in this issue cover an update on the state of altmetrics from the Impactstory team, a rubric for the assessment of…

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Historically, the value of publication has been measured by success in the marketplace and impact of the publication, whether that impact be cultural or scholarly. The calculus of this value has been as straightforward as number of copies sold (documented most widely in “best seller” lists) and/or dollars in profit generated to the complex citation and referral counts that result in a scholarly “impact factor.” As with so many areas of our cultural and intellectual…

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