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Charles Wright, author of nearly two dozen books of poetry as well as two volumes in the University of Michigan Press’s Poets on Poetry series, has been named America’s Poet Laureate by the Library of Congress, as reported by the New York Times. Wright’s books of criticism with the Press include Quarter Notes: Improvisation and Interviews and Halflife: Improvisations and Interviews, 1977-87. “I’m very honored and flattered to be picked, but also somewhat confused,” Wright told…

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Michigan Publishing is pleased to announce the launch of Ergo, an Open Access Journal of Philosophy. According to the editors, Ergo responds to “a need for general philosophy journals that are efficient, open access, inclusive, and transparent.” While maintaining very high standards for acceptance (since the journal began accepting submissions in July 2013, the editors and reviewers have rejected 93% of 170 submissions), Ergo also hopes to begin to address the imbalance in gender and race…

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Copyright and State Government Documents: Raising Awareness Thursday May 29, 12-1:00 PM Gallery Lab, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library [floorplan] Many state government documents are subject to copyright, despite the fact that federal government documents are not. Misperceptions and challenges abound regarding state documents, and can create difficulties when libraries seek to provide digital access to these works. Kristina Eden and Justin Bonfiglio of the U-M Library Copyright Office have been working with colleagues at Stanford…

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Happy spring! The temperatures are finally starting to warm up a bit here in Ann Arbor, and April showers have begun to replace the snow. We’re pleased to share with you our new content from the month of March: A new issue of The Journal of Electronic Publishing is now available online.  JEP 17.1 is an experimental issue of the proceedings of Books in Browsers IV. From managing editor Jonathan McGlone: “Emboldened by the experimental…

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If you’ve ever wanted to learn the basics of programming, now is your chance. Professor Chuck Severance of the University of Michigan School of Information (or as we know him here on campus, Dr. Chuck) is teaching “Programming for Everybody” as a MOOC via Coursera starting this week. Both the course and the textbook are free, and book itself is available in a variety of formats, including PDF, EPUB, MOBI for Kindle, and an Apple iBooks version which includes interactive…

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Fritz Swanson teaches in the English Department at the University of Michigan. In January, with the support of the Helen Zell Writers’ Program and with space donated by the University Library and the U-M Press, he began operating a letterpress shop to teach students the process of composing and printing short works, dubbing it ‘Wolverine Press.’ Having now completed a semester’s worth of projects, we’ve asked Swanson to reflect on the experience of running the…

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Regular users of EEBO-TCP may have noticed that the corpus recently grew by a few thousand texts. As of March 2014, 3,913 new titles have been released, bringing the total number of texts in Phase II to 22,971! The complete EEBO-TCP corpus (Phases I and II together) now contains 48,339 books. These new titles are already available in the University of Michigan EEBO-TCP interface, and will soon be synced to the University of Oxford platform….

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Accessing the Public Domain Friday, March 28, 2014 10:00am to 12:00pm Hatcher Graduate Library, Gallery (Room 100) Location Information Join us for a conversation with copyright experts about the effort to determine the copyright status of works in the vast and growing collections of digitized library material. The library’s grant-funded, multi-institutional copyright review management system (CRMS) has thus far identified almost 200,000 public domain works that can now be read by anyone with an Internet connection. Panelists will…

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We are happy to announce the latest title from diitalculturebooks, Pastplay: Teaching and Learning History with Technology edited by Kevin Kee. Pastplay is the fourth title in our Digital Humanities series. This book, a collection of essays by leading history and humanities researchers and teachers, argues that we should play with technology in history because doing so enables us to see the past in new ways. In the field of history, the Web and other…

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It has been quite the cold and snowy start to the new year here at the University of Michigan. Luckily, that hasn’t stopped us from releasing a bevy of new content in the past two months: ARKIVOC, the open access organic chemistry journal, released 160 new and updated articles (!). Articles from ARKIVOC are freely available  for all to read or download. A new issue of the Journal of Anthropological Research was published. JAR 69.4…

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