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This Fall, digitalculturebooks will be releasing its first book in the new Digital Humanities Series. The purpose of this series is to “feature rigorous research that advances understanding of the nature and implications of the changing relationship between humanities and digital technologies.” MPublishing was able to sit down with one of the series editors and Professor of Humanities in the English Department at Wayne State University, Julie Thompson Klein, to discuss her own digital humanities…

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University of Michigan Press writer Margaret Price, author of the new book Mad at School, recently appeared in an extensive story about mental disabilities on university campuses posted by the Chronicle of Higher Education. In the article, professor and author Benjamin Reiss writes, “Margaret Price makes clear in her book, Mad at School, influential voices are arguing that we should try to get around the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act regulations, which protect the…

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Blaine Pardoe writes about Frederick Zinn, a war hero from his hometown of Battle Creek/Galesburg, Michigan in Lost Eagles: One Man’s Mission to Find Missing Airmen in Two World Wars. Pardoe talks about how be became aware of Zinn and learned of his fascinating story and enduring legacy. Read more


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Why would women want to perform as men? Why is gender crossing so compelling, whether it happens onstage or in everyday life? What can drag performance teach, and what aesthetic, political, and personal questions does it raise? We spoke with Diane Torr, co-author of Sex, Drag, and Male Roles to answer these questions and more. Read the interview Listen to the podcast


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Stephen W. Salant, professor of economics at University of Michigan, is the creator of Successful Strategic Deception: A Case Study, recently published by SPO.  The project features a new analysis of the controversial case against Alger Hiss, a  U.S. State Department official suspected of spying for the Soviet Union, and ultimately convicted of perjury in 1950.  Professor Salant shared with us the history of his work on this case, and his perspective on how his…

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