by on

Lynda Powell, who was recently awarded the prestigious Richard J. Fenno Jr. prize from the American Political Science Association (APSA) for her book The Influence of Campaign Contributions in State Legislatures, contributed an editorial to the Washington Post’s Monkey Cage blog ahead of Tuesday’s elections. In her post, Powell notes that campaign contributions do not have a clear effect on state legislators’ votes on a particular bill, as lawmakers decide primarily on “ideology, partisanship and constituency…

Read the full post »


by on

Last week, the Hammarskjöld Commission released a 61-page report reevaluating the circumstances surrounding Dag Hammarskjöld’s death more than fifty years ago. Hammarskjöld, the second Secretary-General of the United Nations, was on a diplomatic mission when his plane crashed in Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia) on the night of September 17-18, 1961. While the crash was ruled accidental at the time, there has been persistent speculation that the plane was shot down by another aircraft. The new report…

Read the full post »


by on

In a review essay encompassing the history of the United Nations, the Wall Street Journal’s George Melloan highly praises Roger Lipsey’s new biography of  the UN’s second secretary-general Dag Hammarskjöld, saying ”no one has sketched his life and peacekeeping endeavors with such depth and breadth as Mr. Lipsey.” “Mr. Lipsey sees two Hammarskjölds, one a man of action taming dangerous political passions and the other a deeply introspective philosopher,” Melloan writes. “Mr. Lipsey describes a man who,…

Read the full post »


by on

If you’ve been shopping our site through the holiday season and into the new year, you may have noticed a few changes. We recently completed a relaunch of the University of Michigan Press website, with a new design, improved features, and additional search and browsing options that will help you find just the book you’re looking for. In the coming weeks and months, we’ll be rolling out even more features and improvements to the site….

Read the full post »


by on

With The Hobbit hitting theatres this week, LA Weekly, part of the Village Voice family of free papers, interviewed International Relations of Middle-earth co-author Patrick James about the book’s origins and using Tolkien to teach real-world multinational conflict. In the interview, James credited Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings film trilogy with creating a “pop culture touchstone,” making the situations and themes that pervade Frodo and Sam’s journey relateable and therefor even more useful in the classroom. For professors planning…

Read the full post »


by on

This Fall, University of Michigan’s Rackham Graduate School will feature three University Press authors in its Centennial Alumni Lectures series. The lecture series is a showcase for U-M graduates to present on a topic in their fields, highlighting the university’s diversity and intellectual legacy. More than 6o lectures, each hosted by a graduate department, will take place over the month of October. Among the presenters are Press authors Lea M. Stirling, Deborah R. Geis, and…

Read the full post »


by on

David Enders, author of Baghdad Bulletin and the forthcoming Death of a Nation, appeared on Dan Rather Reports Tuesday evening to discuss the ongoing conflict in Syria between forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad and opposition forces seeking to drive his regime from power. After showing Enders’ devastating footage from villages decimated by the brutality of Assad’s armies,


by on

The University of Michigan Press and HASTAC (the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advance Collaboratory) are pleased to announce the selection of Jentery Sayers and Sheila Brennan as recipients of the UM Press/HASTAC Digital Humanities Publication Prize. Each Prize carries $5,000 in subvention funds and an advance contract with the Press series DigitalHumanities@digitalculturebooks.


by on

Maurice Sendak (photo: Federico Novaro/flickr cc) Maurice Sendak, the renowned children’s book author best known for Where the Wild Things Are, passed away last Tuesday morning at the age of 83. On a day that included many remembrances and tributes across the literary world, U-M Press author Ellen Handler Spitz (Illuminating Childhood) was a guest on NPR’s Madeleine Brand Show to speak about Sendak’s life and work.