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Four titles in our imprint, digitalculturebooks, have just been made available to view for free online through Creative Commons licenses (BY-NC-ND): Digital Rubbish: A Natural History of Electronics, by Jennifer Gabrys The American Literature Scholar in the Digital Age, edited by Amy E. Earhart and Andrew Jewell Home Truths? Video Production and Domestic Life, by David Buckingham, Maria Pini, and Rebeckah Willett The New Woman International: Representations in Photography and Film from the 1870s through…

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Terri Geitgey is the Manager of Library Print Services at MPublishing. On April 4 & 5, she attended the Coalition for Networked Information spring meeting in San Diego, California. I attended the Coalition for Networked Information spring meeting to do a co-presentation with staff from the University of Utah Library on our respective experiences with the Espresso Book Machine (EBM). Our session, The Espresso Book Machine in the Library: Case Studies from Two University Libraries,…

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From the press release: The University of Michigan Library’s Copyright Office is launching the first serious effort to identify orphan works among the in-copyright holdings of the HathiTrust Digital Library, which is funding the project. The vast majority of HathiTrust’s holdings are in-copyright (73%). An unknown percentage of these are so-called “orphans,” that is, in-copyright works whose owners cannot be identified or located. The lack of hard data on the number of orphans in the…

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Copyright law is, for good or for ill, now a part of the academic experience.  Learning about copyright and alternative models of distribution, such as Creative Commons and Open Access, is an important piece of effectively navigating the waters of the new educational reality. The third annual eCornucopia conference at Oakland University will examine specific examples about how openness is implemented in higher education and the importance of increasing the transparency and accessibility of knowledge….

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On May 4, I taught an Enriching Scholarship session called The Care and Keeping of eBooks. The title–which I made up when I proposed the session back in December–may not be the best description of what we did. The workshop was really more like “The Dissection and Creation of eBooks.” My goals were that the attendees would: better understand the place of the EPUB format in the landscape of digital publishing have a sense of…

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April is always a time of transition for MPublishing, as members of our hardworking student staff trade in their keyboards for mortarboards and leave us behind. These students do much of the day-to-day work of converting our publications to standard formats–XML and TIFF–for publication online in the DLXS infrastructure used by the U-M Library. Below is a summary of their most recent projects, all new content released in the last month: Arkivoc, the open access…

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After a distinguished career in publishing, University of Michigan Press Director Phil Pochoda will be (technically) retiring September 1.Over the past decade, Pochoda took the Press from being a publisher concentrated on traditional delivery of books to being an innovator in the field. Virtually every book the Press now produces is available to read or hear in a multitude of ways, from traditional words on paper to a variety of electronic, ebook and audio formats….

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